White Light Joins Production Services Association


White Light has recently joined the Production Services Association (PSA), reaffirming the company’s commitment to the welfare of its freelancers.

The PSA is the trade association for companies and individuals involved in the live event production industry. Its aim is to represent, improve, educate and develop the business of technical production for live events. This is achieved by pooling the knowledge of the entire industry to create a single voice and a central resource for its members.

The association is directed by its members through the PSA Council. One of these council members includes John McEvoy, who is WL’s Head of Business Delivery Resources. John comments: “I’ve been involved with the PSA for several years now and know what a brilliant organisation it is. It’s there to deal with the real day-to-day issues that many freelancers face and ensures that they are backed by a strong support network who can offer everything from legal advice to any generic queries”.

He adds: “At WL, part of my role is to look after all of the freelancers on our books. I want to ensure that anyone who works alongside WL is given the very best support possible and knows that we take the responsibility of looking after our freelancers very seriously. As a company, we’re renowned for our people and their friendly, approachable nature. We want to make WL a great, supportive place for anyone to work hence why joining the PSA is so important”.

The PSA was formed in the early 1990s at the International Live Music Conference when a group of forward-thinking individuals decided that the industry had issues best addressed by one voice speaking as a whole. Since then, the organisation has encouraged its members to make them aware of any issues that need addressing. The initial contact is usually made through the PSA office or council member. The PSA has many functions but one of the most important ones is that of pooling the resources of the industry to tackle any issue. The PSA is also widely recognised as the body that can represent the views of the industry when deciding on legislation and codes of practice.

John concludes: “Ultimately, it’s the freelancers who are out there on a day-to-day basis delivering our projects and acting as our representatives. Everyone who works for us is part of the WL family and we want to show our commitment to them by offering all of the benefits they deserve”.